Pay for mathematics thesis

Considering Grad School FAQ - Department of <strong>Mathematics</strong>

Considering Grad School FAQ - Department of Mathematics The Master's degree in mathematics encompasses the basic graduate curriculum in mathematics, and also offers the opportunity of some more specialized training in an area of interest. A typical Master's course of study will involve basic courses in real analysis, complex analysis and linear algebra, followed by other fundamental courses such as probability, scientific computing, and differential equations. Most mathematics departments support most of their students through. the full costs of tuition as well as living expenses, although there may be some fees to pay. Your thesis advisor would suggest what further classes you should take.

M. S. in <b>Mathematics</b> Department of <b>Mathematics</b> NYU Courant

M. S. in Mathematics Department of Mathematics NYU Courant When you order cheap custom essays , rest assured that you will never receive plagiarized essays from us because our writers have access to updated sources and all papers are checked using modern plagiarism software! We believe that experience makes us a top cheap custom essay writing service . The Master's degree in mathematics encompasses the basic graduate curriculum in mathematics, and also offers the opportunity of some more specialized training in an.

<em>Thesis</em> about community service - Dominican College

Thesis about community service - Dominican College The Department of Mathematics at the University of North Texas provides a collaborative, open and academiy stimulating climate for graduate study. degree provides a deeper understanding of mathematical theory and que for use in a wide variety of academic and non-academic careers. The combination of hh-quality mathematical training, expansive instructional training and practical teaching opportunities will give you a competitive edge in the marketplace. Mathematical logic and set theory with an emphasis on forcing, consistency results, combinatorial set theory and inner model theory. Jianguo Liu, Associate Professor and Undergraduate Advisor; Ph. Optimization; scientific computation; applied mathematics. John Quintanilla, Professor and Undergraduate Studies Associate Dean; Ph. Applied probability; stochastic geometry; percolation thresholds; random heterogeneous materials. We offer instruction and research leading to Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees in Mathematics. degree allows you to develop competence in several major areas of mathematics and prepares you for intensive study and research in a specialized area. Our students obtain math-related employment in academic and non-academic settings. Optimization; parallel computing and engineering desn; topological s; operator algebras and unitary representations of loy compact s. Jul 10, 2017. A thesis about community service thesis or dissertation is a document. Hundreds of thousands of help with my math homework online.

Research Option for Applied or Discrete <strong>Mathematics</strong> School of.

Research Option for Applied or Discrete Mathematics School of. He was about eight when he had to move to a country school to recover from a dangerous fever. It was about 1808 when the Babbage family decided to move into the old Rowdens house, located in East Teignmouth, and Benjamin Babbage became a warden of the nearby church of St. The father of Charles was a rich man, so it was possible for Charles to receive instruction from several elite schools and teachers during the course of his elementary education. He was son of Benjamin Babbage, a banking partner of the Praeds who owned the Bitton Estate in Teignmouth and Betsy Plumleigh Babbage. His parents sentenced that his "brain was not to be taxed too much"; Babbage wrote: "this great idleness may have led to some of my childish reasonings." Then, he joined King Edward VI Grammar School in Totnes, South Devon, a thriving comprehensive school that's still operative today, but his fragile health status forced him back to private teaching for a period. Then, he finally joined a 30-student closed number academy managed by Reverend Stephen Freeman. The academy had a big library, where Babbage used to study mathematics by himself, and learned to love it. He had two more personal tutors after leaving the academy. One was a clergyman of Cambridge, and about him Babbage said: "I fear I did not derive from it all the advantages that I might have done.". The other one was an Oxford tutor who teached Babbage the Classics, so that he could be accepted to Cambridge. Babbage arrived at Trinity College, Cambridge in October 1810. He had a big culture - he knew Lagrange, Leibniz, Lacroix, Simpson... Peacock, and other friends, decided to form the Analytical Society. and he was seriously disappointed about the math programs available at Cambridge. When, in 1812, Babbage transferred to Peterhouse, Cambridge, he was the best mathematician; but he failed to graduate with honours. He received an honorary degree later, without even being examinated, in 1814. In 1814, Charles Babbage married Georgiana Whitmore at St. His father, for some reason, never gave his approvation. They lived in tranquility at 5 Devonshire Street, Portland Place, London. Tragically, Charles' father, his wife and one of his sons all died in 1827. In Babbage's times there was a really high error rate in the calculation of math tables, when Babbage planned to find a new method that could be use to make it mechanically, removing the human error factor. He discussed the main principles of a calculating engine in a letter he wrote to Sir H. Babbage presented something that he called "difference engine" to the Royal Astronomical Society on Jun 14, 1822 and in a paper entitled "Note on the application of machinery to the computation of astronomical and mathematical tables." It was able to calculate polynomials by using a numerical method called the differences method. This idea started to tickle his brain very early, in 1812. The Society approved the idea, and the government granted him 1500 to construct it, in 1823. Three different elements influenced him in this decision: he disliked untidiness and unprecision; he was very able with logarithmical tables; he was inspired from an existing work on calculating machines produced by W. Charles Babbage converted one of the rooms in his home to a workshop and hired Joseph Clement to oversee construction of the engine. Every part had to be formed by hand using custom machine tools, many of which Babbage himself designed. He took extensive tours of industry to better understand manufacturing processes. Based on these trips and his experience with the difference engine, Babbage published On the Economy of Machinery and Manufacture in 1832. It was the first publication on what we would now call operations research. The death of Georgiana, Babbage's father, and an infant son interrupted construction in 1827. Work had already taxed Babbage heavily and he was on the edge of a breakdown. John Herschel and several other friends convinced Babbage to take a trip to Europe to recuperate. He passed through the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, and Italy visiting universities and manufacturing facilities. In Italy he learned he had been named the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics. He initially wanted to turn down the position but several friends convinced him to accept. He moved to 1 Dorset Street upon returning to England in 1828. The difference engine project had come under fire during Babbage's absence. Rumours had spread that Babbage had wasted the government's money; that the machine did not work; and that it had no practical value if it did. John Herschel and the Royal Society publicly defended the engine. The government continued its support, advancing 1500 on April 29, 1829, 3000 on December 3, and 3000 on February 24, 1830. Work continued, but Babbage would have continual difficulty getting money from the treasury. Babbage's problems with the treasury coincided with numerous disagreements with Clement. Babbage had built a two-story, 50 foot long workshop behind his house. It had a glass roof for lighting, and a fireproof, dust-free room to contain the machine. Clement refused to move his operations to the new workshop and demanded more money for the difficulty of travelling across town to oversee construction. In response, Babbage suggested that Clement draw his pay directly from the treasury. Before then, Babbage would get money from the government that he would use to pay Clement. He often had to pay Clement out of his own pocket when the bureaucracy lagged behind Clement's pay schedule. Clement further refused to turn over the drawings and tools used to build the difference engine. After an investment of 23000, including 6000 of Babbage's own money, work on the unfinished machine ceased in 1834. Charles wrote, "The drawings and parts of the Engine are at length in a place of safety I am almost worn out with disgust and annoyance at the whole affair." In 1842 the government officially abandoned the project. While he was separated from the difference engine, Babbage began to think about an improved calculating engine. Between 18 he tried to build a machine that would be programmable to do any kind of calculation, not just ones relating to polynomial equations. The first breakthrough came when he redirected the machine's output to the input for further equations. He described this as the machine "eating its own tail". It did not take much longer for him to define the main points of his analytical engine. The mature analytical engine used punched cards adapted from the Jacquard loom to specify input and the calculations to perform. Babbage and a handful of assistants created 500 large design drawings, 1000 sheets of mechanical notation, and 7000 sheets of scribbles. The engine consisted of two parts: the mill and the store. The completed mill would measure 15 feet tall and 6 feet in diameter. Babbage constructed only small test parts for his new engine; a full engine was never completed. The mill, analogous to a modern computer's CPU, executed the operations on values retrieved from the store, which we would consider memory. In 1842, following repeated failures to obtain funding from the First Lord of the Treasury, Babbage approached Sir Robert Peel for funding. Peel refused, and offered Babbage a knighthood instead. He would continue modifying and improving the design for many years to come. In October 1842, Federico Luigi, Conte Menabrea, an Italian general and mathematician, published a paper on the analytical engine. Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, a longtime friend of Babbage, translated the paper into English. Charles suggested that she add notes to accompany the paper. In a series of letters between 18, the pair collaborated on seven notes, the combined length of which was three times longer than the actual paper. In one note Ada prepared a table of execution for a program that Babbage wrote to calculate the Bernoulli numbers. In another, she wrote about a generalized algebra engine that could perform operations on symbols as well as numbers. Lovelace was perhaps the first to grasp the more general goals of Babbages machine, and some consider her the world's first computer programmer. She began work on a book describing the analytical engine in more detail, but it was never finished. Between October 1846 and March 1849 Babbage started designing a second difference engine using knowledge gained from the analytical engine. It used only about 8000 parts, three times fewer than the first. Unlike the analytical engine that he continually tweaked and modified, he did not try to improve the second difference engine after completing the initial design. Babbage made no attempt to actually construct the machine. The 24 schematics remained in the Science Museum archives until a full-size replica was built 1985-1991 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Babbages birth. It measured 11 feet long, 7 feet high and 18 inches deep, and weighted 2.6 tonnes. The limits of precision were restricted to those achievable by Babbage. In 1824 Babbage won the Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society "for his invention of an engine for calculating mathematical and astronomical tables". From 1828 to 1839 Babbage was Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge. He contributed largely to several scientific periodicals, and was instrumental in founding the Astronomical Society in 1820 and the Statistical Society in 1834. In 1837, responding to the official eight Bridgewater Treatises "On the Power, Wisdom and Goodness of God, as manifested in the Creation", he published his Ninth Bridgewater Treatise putting forward the thesis that God had the omnipotence and foresight to create as a divine legislator, making laws (or programs) which then produced species at the appropriate times, rather than continually interfering with ad hoc miracles each time a new species was required. The book incorporated extracts from correspondence he had been having with John Herschel on the subject. Charles Babbage also achieved notable results in cryptography. He broke Vigenre's autokey cipher as well as the much weaker cipher that is called Vigenre cipher today. The autokey cipher was generally called "the undecipherable cipher", though owing to popular confusion, many thought that the weaker polyalphabetic cipher was the "undecipherable" one. Babbage's discovery was used to aid English military campaigns, and was not published until several years later; as a result credit for the development was instead given to Friedrich Kasiski, who made the same discovery some years after Babbage. Babbage also invented the pilot (also called a cow-catcher), the metal frame attached to the front of locomotives that clears the tracks of obstacles in 1838. He also performed several studies on Isambard Kingdom Brunel's Great Western Railway. He only once endeavoured to enter public life, when, in 1832, he stood unsuccessfully for the borough of Finsbury. Parts of Babbage's uncompleted mechanisms are available for visits in the London Science Museum. In 1991 a difference engine was completed, starting from Babbage's original plans, and it functioned perfectly. - Passages from the Life of a Philosopher (Charles Babbage). - Charles Babbage: Pioneer of the Computer (Anthony Hyman). - Irascible Genius: A Life of Charles Babbage, Inventor (Maboth Moseley). This site will tell you Who is Charles Babbage, and you'll find - as well - Pictures of mathematician Charles Babbage and the Charles Babbage computer. Everything about Charles Babbage history and Charles Babbage difference engine models. Interesting references and materials about Charles Babbage. If you are asking yourself what did Charles Babbage invent, this is the ultimate place to visit. Either MATH 2698/4698 research for pay or MATH 2699/4699 research for. 4702 Undergraduate Research Thesis Writing in which the student prepares.

EPFL theses EPFL

EPFL theses EPFL The FIU Art Education graduate and undergraduate programs are accredited by NCATE and NASAD, two of the highest national accrediting organizations in the areas of Teacher Education and Fine Arts. FIU is the only institution with such distinction in South Florida. IMPORTANT: Students must be enrolled very year in order to remain admitted and complete the master’s program in six (6) years. Students must apply for graduation one (1) semester prior to graduation and minimum registration of one (1) graduate credit is required in the semester of graduation. IMPORTANT: Students must be enrolled every year in order to remain admitted and complete the master’s program in six (6) years. Students must apply for graduate practicum/student teaching prior to July 1st for the following Spring internship. Students must apply for graduation one (1) semester prior to graduation and minimum registration of one (1) graduate credit is required in the semester of graduation. Thirunarayanan E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-2085 The Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction program requires 36 semester hours beyond the bachelors degree. MASTERS OF CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION Program Leader: Dr. Up to 6 semester hours of graduate credit may be transferred into the masters program. Applicants for the program, which is an on-campus-based classroom experience, must select (i.e., Curriculum Development, Elementary Education, English Education, Learning Technologies, Mathematics Education, Modern Language Education, Physical Education, Science Education, Social Studies Education, or Special Education) The Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction program includes five required components: Admission Requirements Applicants for admission into the Master of Science in Curriculum and Instruction program must meet the minimum University Graduate School admission criteria. Admission to the masters program will be based on the following criteria: Admission Procedures In order to begin the masters program, a student must be accepted into the University Graduate School and the program in Curriculum and Instruction. Admission procedures are as follows: Program Leader: Dr. Charles Bleiker E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-2524 Degree Program Hours: (36) The Master of Science degree in Early Childhood Education provides graduate training in the understanding and teaching of children from birth to eight. Elective Course OR Thesis (3 hours) Select one (1) advisor approved elective in education, psychology, human development, or related field. The program provides students with a foundation in curriculum and instruction and specialization in learning and development during early childhood. degree in Early Childhood Education are as follows: Program Requirements The M. in Early Childhood Education program requires all students to take 15 hours of foundation courses in curriculum and instruction and in methods/statistics. Students may opt to complete a thesis instead of taking an elective course. Admissions Requirements Applicants must meet the minimum University Graduate School admissions requirements. Students take an additional 18 hours within early childhood education/development, and 3 hours of education-related electives. Graduation Requirements Students must meet all Department, College, Graduate School, and University graduation requirements. No grades of “C-“ or less received in courses that are part of a masters program of study will be accepted toward graduation. Peter Cistone E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-2665 The Master of Science (M. S.) degree program in Educational Leadership comprises courses and experiences designed to develop entry level competencies in the practice of educational leadership. The program incorporates coursework that constitutes the "modified Florida program in educational leadership" at Florida International University and addresses the competencies assessed in the Florida Educational Leadership Examination. The program may be used to satisfy part of the requirements of the Florida Department of Education for state certification in Educational Leadership. Program of Study The program of study (13 courses/39 semester hours is as follows: *Successful completion of EDA 6943: Administrative Internship requires that the student pass all sub-tests of the Florida Educational Leadership Examination (FELE). Admission Requirements Admission to the program is based on the following criteria: Note: The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is not a requirement for admission consideration for the M. Evidence of having successfully passed the FELE must be provided by the student no later than the last week of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. In addition, successful completion of the program requires that the student provide evidence of having satisfied State of Florida ESOL requirements that demonstrate mastery of the four ESOL standards required of school administrators. Close International graduate student applicants whose native language is not English are required to submit a score for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or for the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A total score of 80 on the i BT TOEFL or 6.5 overall on the IELTS is required. In addition to official transcripts and test scores, all applicants must submit a statement of purpose and a resume/curriculum vitae. Supporting documents are to be sent to FIU Graduate Admission Office, 11200 SW 8th Street, PC 230, Miami, FL 33199. Admission to the program is contingent upon departmental approval. Prerequisites One course in general linguistics or the successful completion of LIN 3010 or LIN 3013. Graduation Requirements: Students must have a 3.0 GPA to graduate from the program. Grades of “C-“ or below will not be counted towards meeting program requirements. Thesis Option: Students may opt to extend the MS program (3 to 6 additional thesis credit hours) by request. Close Program Leader: Eric Dwyer E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-2078 Degree Program Hours: (36) The Master of Science in Foreign Language: TESOL Track is designed to provide specialized training and content knowledge for teachers of all levels of ESOL, K through 12, adult education and community college education. Students who are state certified teachers may include the five courses required for the Add-on ESOL Endorsement as part of the Master’s program. Degree Requirements The Master of Science degree consists of 36 semester hours. A maximum of six semester hours may be transferred into the program from outside the University, subject to the approval of the major advisor. A maximum of six semester hours of graduate level courses taken as an undergraduate may be included in the program provided they have not been used to satisfy degree requirements for an undergraduate program. Prerequisite Introduction to Linguistics is the prerequisite for the Linguistics courses in the program. It may be satisfied with LIN 3010, LIN 3013, or LIN 5018. Required Program: (36) Professional Education: (9) EDF 5481 Foundations of Educational Research (3) EDF 6608 Social/Philosophical/ Historical Foundations of Education (3) EDF 6211 Psychological Foundations of Education (3) Program Courses: (18) Electives: (9) Students will choose nine semester hours according to their needs, with the approval of the advisor. To meet state ESOL requirements, certified teachers (K-12) need to include in their electives the following courses: Graduation Requirements To receive the Master of Science degree in TESOL, the student must complete the required 36 semester hours of course work with a minimum ‘B’ or 3.0 grade point average and no grades of “C-“ or less received in courses that are part of a masters program of study will be accepted toward graduation. Close MS in Higher Education Administration E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-3418 The Master of Science in Higher Education Administration prepares graduates to serve in a variety of roles at colleges and universities and related institutions. The academic program operates as a partnership with FIU's Student Affairs division, and integrates class-work with assistantships and practicums for a total learning experience. As a majority-minority institution, FIU is the prototype for universities of the 21st century. Students in the program will have the opportunity to work and study in one of the most diverse higher education environments in the nation. FAQ PDF Admission Requirements Electives: (12 hrs) Students will select a set of electives to meet their educational and professional interests. Selection of electives can include a concentration in a particular area of higher education as well as provide a breadth of knowledge about the field. Required Courses The required courses reflect the range of basic knowledge common to all higher education professionals. Whatever the job function, it is imperative that university professionals know the law, be aware of current issues, be sensitive to the diversity of student cultures, and understand the core functions of administration. Electives Electives are designed to allow students to choose a path of study that reflects their immediate career goals, while maintaining program coherence. There are opportunities for electives at the student’s discretion, as long as they are graduate level courses (500 level or above). Practicum Experiences A professional degree in university administration should allow for some guided practical experience. The practicum sections allow students the opportunity to earn credit while gaining valuable hands-on experience in a variety of administrative areas. Practicum sections will include an academic component designed by the Higher Education faculty and the section supervisor. Practicum Packet Graduate Assistantships The Division of Student Affairs has a number of graduate assistantships available each year that may be of interest to higher education administration masters students. These assistantships are promoted and placements are coordinated through the Student Affairs Graduate Association (SAGA); therefore prospective students should visit their website for further information. Most assistantships for the following academic year are filled in February or March through interviews during SAGA Days. Sarah Mathews The Master of Science degree in International and Intercultural Education (IIE) at FIU is uniquely designed to provide graduate training to students interested in understanding the processes of globalization, the global environment, and the responsibilities of citizenship in an increasingly interdependent world. Student Affairs Graduate Association The Student Affairs Graduate Association (SAGA) is an organization for students in the Higher Education Administration program pursuing the Student Affairs track. The program places special emphasis on training in cross-cultural communication and exchange, international development, and educational practice in a global context. SAGA's mission is to foster graduate student education through providing unique learning opportunities that help students grow academically, professionally, and socially. Hilary Landorf Email: landor[email protected] number: (305)348-3418 Program Faculty: Dr. Our program includes face-to-face, hybrid, and fully-online courses. Eric Dwyer ([email protected], affiliated faculty), Dr. These courses provide research and analytical skills to enable students to define, gather, analyze and evaluate data for project management and decision-making. Applied courses are designed to provide the professional competencies for academic research, teaching and administration, and employment in foundations, non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions, businesses and corporations. Our students have worked in several countries and regions such as Spain, Andorra, South Korea, the Caribbean, Africa, Latin America, Germany, and the U. in a range of capacities including: K-12 social science teachers, ESL teachers in the U. and abroad, international education credential experts, and international education study abroad program directors. Some of our Master's students hold graduate assistantships in the School of Education and Human Development as well as undertake internships across campus in various departments. Admission Requirements To be admitted into the Master’s degree program in International/Intercultural Education (IIE), a student must have (a) a bachelor’s degree from an accredited U. institute or its equivalent for international students, (b) a 3.0 GPA or higher for the last 60 hours of upper-division coursework (c) three letters of recommendation, and (d) an autobiographical statement. Letters and other supporting documents should be sent to FIU Graduate Admissions Office, 11200 SW 8th Street, PC 230, Miami, FL 33199. Degree Requirements The Master’s program requires the completion of a minimum of 33 semester hours of course work at the graduate level with a 3.0 GPA. A maximum of six semester hours of graduate work may be transferred to the program from other universities. The 33 semester hours are to be completed in accordance with the program curriculum. Required Program (33 minimum) These program requirements apply to students who enter the IIE program in Fall 2013 or later. The IIE program blends together theoretical foundations and methodological perspectives. Graduate students are exposed to the role of the social, political, economic, scientific and cultural sectors in education worldwide. Research and analytical skills are provided to ensure student’s ability to define, gather, analyze and evaluate data for project management and decision-making. Applied courses are designed to provide the professional competencies for academic research, teaching and administration, and employment in foundations, non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions, businesses and corporations. These program requirements apply to students who enter the IIE program in Fall 2013 or later. Foundations of International and Intercultural Education (6) Geo Cultural Area (3) The purpose of this requirement is to give the student a foundation in the culture, politics, and history of an area or region. The student will select one course that relates to his/her geo-cultural interest. Any upper level course (5000 level or above) in an area of the world is eligible. Policy (3) This course is selected in consultation with the advisor from the School of Education and Human Development. Areas of Interest – (9) Students in IIE go into a number of areas for work and study. Primary among these are (1) Internationalization and Intercultural Studies, (2) International and Comparative Education, and (3) Globalization, Development, and Sustainability. To complete this requirement, students must choose one area of interest and take three courses selected in consultation with and approved by the advisor. Internationalization and Intercultural Studies Program Leaders: Dr. Charmaine De Francesco E-mail: [email protected]:(305) 348-3163 The Master of Science degree program in Physical Education is designed to provide advanced preparation for teachers of physical education. Applicants must have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division coursework, and include an autobiographical statement, their career goals and aspirations, and three letters of professional recommendation accompanying the application. Letters and any other supporting documents are to be sent to FIU Graduate Admission Office, 11200 SW 8th Street, PC 230, Miami, FL 33199. Degree Hours: (33) Professional Education: (9) Program Leaders: Dr. Charmaine De Francesco E-mail: [email protected]:(305) 348-3163 The purpose of this track is to provide an option for persons seeking a master's degree in an allied (non-teaching) career in physical education. This degree program would primarily be of interest to persons who do not presently hold Florida teaching certification credentials. This degree does not provide teacher certification for the degree recipients. Examples of potential student clientele would include all foreign and American college graduates with bachelor’s degrees in sports science, education, business, recreation, the social sciences, and other areas. Admission Requirements Students must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university and have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division coursework, and include an auto-biographical statement, their career goals and aspirations, and three letters of professional recommendation accompanying the application. The published university requirements for admission into the master’s degree programs must be met. Students who do not have an undergraduate major in physical education or a related area are responsible for meeting the prerequisites for any course listed in the program’s curriculum. A program advisor must be consulted regarding completion of degree requirements. Degree Hours: (33) Required Courses (21) Entry to Program Students are encouraged to meet all admission requirements prior to beginning the program; however, students may take a maximum of twelve (12) semester hours of course work applicable to the program prior to admission. Only courses with a grade of “B” or better taken prior to admission can be included. Graduation Requirements Students must have a 3.0 GPA to graduate from the program. No grades of "C-" or less received in courses that are part of a master's program of study will be accepted toward graduation. All candidates must pass all sections of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam in Reading and either be endorsed in ESOL or complete TSL 5361C. Thesis Option: Students may opt to extend the MS program (6 additional thesis credit hours) by request. Admission Requirements To enter the program in Recreation and Sport Management, a student must have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division courses, career goals and aspirations, and three letters of professional recommendation, possess a bachelor's degree, and have appropriate undergraduate preparation in recreation, sport management or recreational therapy. Hyejin Bang E-mail: [email protected]: 305-348-1411 Brief Description of the Program The graduate program in Recreation and Sport Management provides advanced preparation for management and supervisory level positions within a recreation, sport management or recreational therapy services delivery system. The program includes electives with flexibility regarding an individual's specific career goals goals as a future practitioner in the subplan area of recreation and sport management Admission Requirements To enter the program in Recreation and Sport Management, a student must have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division courses, career goals and aspirations, and three letters of professional recommendation, possess a bachelor's degree, and have appropriate undergraduate preparation in recreation, sport management. Degree Program: (30-33) - Graduate Advising Sheet (PDF) Required Core: (12) Program Leader: Dr. Alexis Mc Kenney E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-3598 More Information: FIU Recreational Therapy Program Site Brief Description of the Program Recreational Therapy, also know as Therapeutic Recreation, is a profession that contributes to the broad spectrum of health care through treatment, education, and the provision of adapted recreational opportunities--all of which are instrumental to improving and maintaining physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning, preventing secondary health conditions, enhancing independent living skills and overall quality of life. The goal of the FIU Recreational Therapy Program is “To prepare competent entry-level recreational therapists in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning domains.” Students learn from faculty members who are all nationally certified and recreational therapists with many years' experience. The graduate program in Recreation and Sport Management provides advanced preparation for management and supervisory level positions within a recreation, sport management or recreational therapy services delivery system. The program includes electives with flexibility regarding an individual's specific career goals as a future practitioner in the recreational therapy track. The Recreational Therapy program is designed to prepare direct service and administrative personnel engaged in recreational therapy service delivery. Admission Requirements To enter the program in Recreation and Sport Management, a student must have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division courses, career goals and aspirations, and three letters of professional recommendation, possess a bachelor's degree, and have appropriate undergraduate preparation in recreation, sport management or recreational therapy. Degree Program: (30-33) - Advising Sheet (PDF) Required Core: (12) **Prerequisites for the Recreational Therapy Track Individuals not currently certified at the professional level (CTRS) by the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification will be required to take the following content courses for completion of the Therapeutic Recreation graduate curriculum: Program Leader: Kyle Bennett E-mail: [email protected]: 305-348-3641 The major competencies in the Master’s Degree program in Special Education are an extension and refinement of those developed by the student in the undergraduate special education curriculum. Program applicants are required to submit an on-line application to the Office of Graduate Admissions, three letters of recommendation (at least one from academic sources and one from work or volunteer experience), and an autobiographical statement. Candidates are admitted by action of the Department’s Graduate Admissions Committee. Criteria for program acceptance include undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher for the last 60 hours of upper division coursework, work and volunteer experience, quality and source of letters of recommendation, and the candidate’s career aspirations and goals. Applicants with less than a 3.0 GPA may be granted conditional admittance. These applicants must take 12 graduate credits and earn a 3.25 GPA to be considered for full admittance. Applicants who do not hold a valid Florida Teaching Certificate must complete all requirements for certification in addition to degree requirements. Letters and any other supporting documents are to be sent to FIU Graduate Admission Office, 11200 SW 8th Street, PC 230, Miami, FL 33199. There are some variations in entrance requirements for in-field vs. In-Field Majors The following master’s program of study is for the student who holds Florida certification in the field of special education. To qualify for admission to the program, students must have the following: * EEX 6912 is a prerequisite for EEX 6228. Area of Concentration: (12) Area of concentration may be a selected endorsement such as Autism or Early Childhood Special Education or other areas as planned and approved by student and advisor. Martha Barantovich E-mail: [email protected]: (305) 348-3220 Master of Science in Urban Education The Master of Science in Urban Education is designed for educators and other professionals who are interested in addressing issues in urban settings and schools and who want to clarify their understanding of theoretical foundations, engage in critical dialogue, and broaden their expertise in action research. This degree emphasizes a social justice theoretical foundation and draws on the belief that students become reflective professionals by developing an understanding of formal and informal education within diverse sociocultural, linguistic, political, and economic contexts. The curriculum requires candidates to produce an Action Research or community-based research project related to justice-oriented urban education. Students will cultivate knowledge and skills to advocate for children and communities both locally and globally. The Master’s program requires the completion of 33 semester hours of course work at the graduate level with a minimum 3.0 GPA. A maximum of six graduate hours may be transferred from another institution, upon approval from an advisor. The program offers instructional and foundational areas of concentration from which students can select. Admission Requirements A decision on admission to the Master’s degree in Urban Education is based on consideration of the following student criteria: 1. Submit a letter of intent describing why this particular degree is of interest, and; 5. Have a 3.0 GPA for the last 60 hours of upper-division coursework; 2. Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals (academic and professional sources) who can assess and describe the applicant’s qualifications and ability to perform graduate level work. Letters and any other supporting documents are to be sent to FIU Graduate Admissions Office, 11200 SW 8th Street, PC 230, Miami, FL 33199. Program of Studies Urban Education Studies Core (9) Required (6): EDF 6211 Psychological Foundations of Education Social, Philosophical, and Historical Foundations of Education 3 Choose one of the following (3): EDF 6636 Intercultural Studies 3 or EDF 6689 Contemporary Issues in Urban Education Cultural/Cross-cultural Studies in Education 3 Action Research Core: (9) EDF 5481 Foundations of Educational Research Action Research for Educators Practicum in Action Research 3 (prerequisite of EDF 6487) Areas of Concentration (15) The Areas of Concentration within the Urban Education degree allow the candidates the candidates the opportunity to critically examine and deepen their understanding of related content. Note: The GRE is not a requirement for admission into the M. These areas are designed to allow students to choose a path of study that reflects their immediate career goals while maintaining program coherence. This area of concentration develops the skills of educators to work with linguistically and culturally diverse populations EDG 5707 Cultural/Cross-cultural Studies in Education Curriculum Development in TESOL Developing ESOL Language and Literacy Special Methods of TESOL Principles of ESOL Testing 3 This area of concentration equips educators with theoretical background and practical skills to work in teaching environments that promote language development in two or more languages. Required Courses (6) FLE 5895 Bilingual Education Teaching Methods Seminar in Second Language Testing Cultural/Cross-cultural Studies in Education 3 Electives (6) One (1) of the following: TSL 6348 Task-Based Language Teaching Curriculum Development in ESOL Special Topics in Second Language Education (Curriculum Development in the Spanish Language Classroom) 3 AND One (1) of the following SPN 5736 Spanish as a Heritage Language Studies in Bilingualism 3 *For those students interested in the Bilingual Graduate Certificate, course modification may be made with advisor approval. This area of concentration emphasizes the deeper development of pedagogical practices that encourages candidates to advocate for children in urban settings. Instruction Required Courses (6) EDG 5325 Analysis of Teaching EDG 5707 Cultural/Cross-cultural Studies in Education 3 Advisor approved content area or elective courses (9) This area of concentration allows candidates to explore urban education from a broader theoretical perspective. Candidates can design their program of study in consultation with their advisor. The Library archives all the EPFL theses dating from the first one in 1920. You can access the electronic version via Infoscience. The Library also offers printed.

<b>Mathematics</b> <b>Thesis</b> Writing in APA Style - my-

Mathematics Thesis Writing in APA Style - my- As I wrote a few papers that go into my final thesis, I however have numerous formats depending on the journal in question. Obviously, it looks much better than Word and alike. I would like to transform them all into one final document with matching layout. I am OK with Te X, but I'd rather see a professional do it. I am now considering two options: My time is limited. I've got a couple more weeks to go and that should be enough for option #1, as I already know a bit of Te X. But I am an external Ph D student and I work on the side. I have two questions: Of course, making it yourself is better in moving your La Te X skills forward, but I do not think this is crucial for an academic career, surely it is not more crucial than submitting a quality thesis in time. People hire services of all kinds, you get grant-writing, typesetting, conference organization, IT, etc. --- very various kind of out-sourced services for which someone can say: To answer your question about La Te X services: I doubt universities have, in general, such services themselves. Some have a La Te X theses class (of varying quality), some even do not have this. However, there are independent La Te X consults and consulting companies. I can't list any since (1) I don't know them and (2) this is not an advertising site. However, remember that these people are highly specialized, and the prices of their services reflect this. The best thing to do would be to practice it yourself and code with the help from forums such as Te X-La Te X at Stack Exchange. If your school/university provides the class file for La Te X formats, then more than half your thesis compilation work is already done for you. The Wikibook on La Te X is a great start and should have nearly all you need to start typesetting your thesis in La Te X. I never thought typesetting a thesis would be much simpler. As my University didn't have a standard thesis class (at that time) I had to come up with my own class file for my masters thesis by deriving it from the existing class file. I had a much easier time than my colleagues who used Word and was very easy to make from the very minute to the most complex changes without affecting the perfection of the formatting. It was La Te X was all about: focus on the content and not the formatting. Instead I'd recommend a very simple copy-and-paste job by yourself. Once you have a template configured (I'm using arsclassica, for example), writing La Te X is for the most part just plain text; 90% of your thesis will copy-and-paste over without incident. Of course, the remaining 10% (tables, references, equations) will be more painful but after a few hours you'll have a great looking document and a decent life skill. An alternative is to try an online La Te X IDE like overleaf (formerly writelatex) which some seem to prefer. I wouldn't recommend desktop La Te X WYSIWYG editors, if you have all your content prepared I'd imagine such an approach would be more of a headache then the copy-and-paste method. Finally, as yo alludes to, many academics do just fine producing horribly-formatted documents, posters and presentations — it's the content that's important afterall. Here's my brief story and two cents, since as recently as half a year ago I was in a similar situation. I was not considering hiring someone to help with La Te X conversion or typesetting (so I won't be commenting on that aspect), so when I said "similar" I meant that in a sense that I had to choose between mastering La Te X to a level good enough to produce my dissertation report of good quality format-wise and producing it in Microsoft Word, the format, which I have used for all of the previous iterations of my dissertation artifacts (multiple revisions of idea paper, proposal and dissertation report drafts). While I had essentially relatively much more time than you have now, I still decided against ultimately converting my dissertation into La Te X format (though I have made some brief attempts, mostly using various software programs that automatically convert some formats into La Te X with varying degree of accuracy). I submitted my final revision in the Word format, but when it was time to submit the document to my institutional e-repository and Pro Quest, I have just converted it to PDF format, using Word's export functionality and the result was good enough. I have made that decision, considering all circumstances at hand and realizing that it would be more valuable to not jeopardize my dissertation schedules, deadlines and defense, while, at the same time, spend more time on producing better software for data analysis and other tasks. Because I understood the importance of mastering La Te X for my future career of researcher, I decided to go the gentle introduction route and started learning enough La Te X and various packages (which involved lots of Internet surfing and some Te X. SE activity), so that I could use some of that functionality in my data analysis software reporting modules (hello, reproducible research! ) as well as in my dissertation defense presentation slides (using La Te X/Beamer). While most previous answers make sense in various aspects, essentially they all are missing your main point and limitation: From my experience, it would be rather naive to expect to master La Te X and a set of necessary supporting packages to be able to produce a good quality dissertation/thesis completely in La Te X (even without fully reproducible workflow; that is, if you have some kind of data analysis part). While I said that I won't be commenting on the hiring external La Te X expert perspective, I just wanted to warn you that, if you will decide to go this route, it is imperative that you would be absolutely confident in a person, whose help you will use, especially, considering your tight deadlines. Of course, it is possible, if you have had enough past experience of typesetting documents in La Te X. It is quite risky, as if something will go wrong (that person will not honor time frames or will have issues with conversion or will produce document of poor quality, etc.), you can imagine what kind of problems you might get yourself into. If you are really invested in having a nicely formatted document, learning La Te X might serve you well. So, unless some people that you trust would highly recommend someone and assure about their La Te X mastery as well as easiness to work with, I would stay away from that route for good. For me personally, using a program like Ly X helped me make the transition between WYSIWYG ("What You See Is What you Get") editors like MS Word and La Te X. I know that some people will disagree with me, but it worked pretty well for me. Knowing people that already know how to use La Te X or Ly X will probably be your best resource if you are under a time constraint (you mentioned that some of your peers use La Te X; maybe they have a template you can use). I was also surprised how much a mathematics/computer science research librarian was able to help me. However, I used a professional academic La Te X and proofreading service as a final checkpoint - correcting both grammar/syntax and format/layout. I found numoerous services online and chose for a service offered by a renounced journal in my field. I believe I chose for the right mixture between knuckling down on my own and professional help. Unless your subject is very mathematical and you have lots of equations in your thesis, I would stay away from latex at this stage-just use what you're more familiar with (I believe you're studying economics). Do not trivialise how much of latex you need to know to produce a good quality thesis bearing in mind you only have a few weeks and you're also working on the side. Alternatively, if you're ok with latex then just try it yourself for a week and see how you get on. As already mentioned, you really have to trust whomever you contract your thesis out to at this stage. You also have to consider whether your supervisors or collaborators would be happy to edit your work in pdf which is the format latex produces-I've been forced to do my work in word because my supervisors prefer to add comments, etc in word. This is not a La Te X only problem, it is valid for almost every decision we make. Is this a one time thing or are you planning on using La Te X to prepare other documents in the future? If you would hire an experts once a year, this will be quite costly. Are you open to the idea of expanding your knowledge? Getting around the basics should not take longer than a day. Many people do not like the work with La Te X, because that little bit of abstract imagination that you need is missing. Preparation for writing a thesis might take a few days. Once you have a solid foundation, prettyfying your thesis will be easy. If you have problems, you have enough knowledge to post a You need this done just once and don't want to invest time in learning something you will never need again. How do you do it when you are looking for a mechanic to fix your car or a doctor to fix up your knee? You talk to people, do some research, read some reviews etc. As already mentioned, there are experts that can do the job for you. There are also non-experts who want to do the job for you, because you have the money. Service A has a nice and professional looking web site, whereas service B has a pretty ugly website. Service A charges more than twice the price than service B, of course you have to ask for the prices first. The most time efficient may be to autoconvert it and then fix the resultant markup. Although I started with Te X and was converting to other formats (*and Media Wiki), I have had acceptable results with Pandoc. The main caveat I have is that tables required special attention to fix. I would strongly advise against making the conversion yourself. Latex hase some nasty caveats which can cost huge amounts of time (creating a double-page table...), if you don't know how to solve them. Combine that with other last minute work, your work and you have a recipe for much more stress than is healthy. At my university there was an ancient latex class going around that had been used for years. If you know any other grad students it might be worth asking them if they have the appropriate style files and classes etc, with a bare-bones outline of their thesis. Even if you don't know any other Ph D students at your university then I'm sure you could track down an email list and spam it. I think people will help you out because everyone knows that Latex can be a pain. I would advise taking this approach or just trying to figure it out yourself. I did my Ph D in Astrophysics and it had a lot of Maths in. After my viva I had a few corrections, most were very minor but involved fiddly corrections in Latex. If you pay someone it could be tricky to communicate exactly what the examiner is asking for. If you want I could try to dig out my old classes/style files to get you started, but they are specific to my university. La Te X is very easy to master in a one or two days. What you need to do is make a list of the non-trivial typesetting tasks. your thesis may contain equations, tables, figures, pictures etc.. Then you just look up in Late X manuals that you can also find online what the commands are. You then make a test tex file where you put in a template for each of the objects, compile it and then see if he result is what is should be. You can then make a few template tex files containing examples for whatever objects you need to use. The next step is then to make a master text file containing the preamble and each chapter can be put in separate tex files. So, instead of putting the whole content in one big file, you make a master file containing commands like \include \include etc. This allows you to work on the editing of the chapters separately. If one chapter requires some more studying to get the typesetting right, you can just skip that one and finish work on the other chapters. You can compile the entire thesis without that chapter, so it's not going to be an obstacle to finish all the other work that you can already do. In case you get stuck, you can get help from experts here who help people free of charge. Mathematics Thesis Writing in APA. APA style of thesis writing is. When you are using this style of writing for your Mathematics Thesis Writing you need to pay.


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